the oregon battery powered chainsaw

when we installed our woodburning fireplace insert, knew we would have to get a new chainsaw too.  Even if we still had our old one, well, frankly, we’re not in any physical shape to handle a gasoline powered saw with a 20″ blade!  After a little research, settled on the Oregon battery powered saw w/ the high capacity lithium battery.  A bit pricey, and would still like to get a second battery, but for what it is, its great.  with a 14″ bar, it can actually cut wood of a sufficient diameter to make a real fire.  The battery lasts long enough to cut some wood, not so long we get totally beat up.  light enough that even a woman can do it!

Hubs is feeling poorly today, the weather is cloudy and damp, and there isn’t much wood in the house.  went out to find that there isn’t much out there for cutting either!

Checked the oil (it was low), and cut up some 2″ pieces, as well as the last of the 6″ that was out there.  and that used up the battery.  That also filled up the inside log holder.  Did find, that for what ever reason, can cut better with the left hand than the right.  As I’m sitting here typing this, can feel every moment I was out there through my left arm!!

So while the battery is charging will feed the dog, make lunch, and maybe take some aspirin.  Then will head out to cut some bigger stuff to bring back for cutting tomorrow, as the day after is predicting snow showers.

If the SHTF, this battery can still be charged using a solar powered generator. the saw itself is quiet – sounds like hedge clippers rather than the noise we’re used to from a gasoline powered chain saw.  By next year, hope to have that back up battery.  Mostly because we’ll have to roam a little farther afield to gather our wood.

Modern technology has given us solar and wind powered generators, and a host of lithium battery powered tools that will make living post EOTHAWKI a lot easier than it might have been even just 20 years ago.  A good generator will even keep that laptop going so you can access that library of e-books, and use those dvd’s to keep the kids happy, and all the music I know you have stashed on a back up memory file.  rechargeable solar lights will keep the evenings bright, and a lot safer than using candles everywhere.  it might be a really nice world!

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Sandy Hook shootings

hopefully, at some time in the future, this even will not have the impact on our emotions that it is having now.  20 children, most 6 years old, the rest close, plus teachers, as well as the gunman’s mother.  What do we do.  Only the head of the NRA refuses the idea of gun sale regulation.  As emotions have people crying out, the blame, of course, is on the guns, not the man.

Just a few days before, someone shot up a mall in the northwest.  Right after, someone was shooting in a parking lot in California.  Then some guy in the midwest threated a school and was busted with 47 guns.  During the memorial services for the children, someone called in a threat to the ‘survivor’s’ lives.  then it was some guy shooting at people in cars on a highway in PA, which also wounded some cops and the gunman being killed.  Today, a fire set in upstate NY and the responding fireman get picked off.

How can you blame people for screaming about guns.  It is a deadly weapon, and in the hands of madmen like this, disasterous.

Gun rights supporters often talk about laws only affect the lawful.  well, if Im lawful, can’t I stand a little more prying to up the anti that the crazy unlawful, at least, will find it harder to get guns?

The NRA only proposes arms in schools, and under the circumstances, have to agree.  Why shouldn’t the teachers and principal ahve the right to concealed carry so they can protect themselves and their children?

And I also agree that we have too much violence in our media and entertainment.  All these shoot ’em up video games are teaching is, if you don’t like what the other guy is doing, shoot ’em! We are becoming inurred to violence.

Would love to know what is driving these folks to this killing frenzy, but that may never be known.  What I do see is people getting more and more stressed and snapping their holds with reality. desperation to feed their familes as government unemployment aide runs out.  And with the weather changes, there will be crop failures, plus crop land being taken out of food production for ethanol production.  poor crops will mean incresed feed costs for cattle, chickens, etc.  This year am thankful for the freezer AND the ability to have the money to splurge on the sale items when they are available.  Help tide us through non-sale days.

Meanwhile, tomorrow is christmas day.  So merry christmas to all, and to all a good night

how much can you do?

Have been reading the LDS preperation manual and it is full of some really good ideas. Not all are applicable to all people (don’t live in a city, don’t work at an outside job, have no children).  Some of the scariest info is in the last few pages; what can happen after.  The stories of what happened after Katrina are sobering, and scary.  But as one person said, how much do you do?

We don’t know when the SWHTF / EOTWAWKI event will happen.  nor do we know what form it will take.  For the folks in New Orleans, Katrina was both!  but it was a recoverable event.  Same with a disasterous earthquake or volcano eruption.  If we suffer from a nationwide bank scare, that will be huge, but also recoverable.  Any nationwide economic event leaves us with some choices about “bugging out”.  What if it is a blight to our food source?  what if it is pandemic?  less choices.  What if it is a world wide event?  even less choices about where to go, and the bigger the event, the longer the recovery time.

Also, what about our existing “debt”.  Such an event may not end our financial obligations on our mortgage, car payments, credit cards.  And if we survive the event, recovery will also reveal our outstanding indebtedness.

So choices have to be made.  The choice to rid ourselves of debt, takes monetary resources we could use for prepping.  We could take all our $$ and put it towards preparedness, but even that won’t guarantee we will survive such a time.  or we could spend no $$ in preparation.

When I read the stories of folks who have lost their jobs and not been able to find work, can you image how much easier their lives would have been if they had reduced debt and had a stash of food on hand?

basically, we each have to make a choice about how much we do at a time.  I’ll buy  a few extra cans of beans or veg each trip to the market.  Sale items on meats, buy a little extra and can it.  Sugar’s on sale, a couple of bags and seal them with the vacuum sealer.  Will can up some complete meals.

My first priority right now is a good bug out bag.  Amazing that I’ve never done it.  Always assume we will have enough time to put it together.  but we live in a forested area and there is every possibility that we could wake up tomorrow morning and have to leave RIGHT NOW!  If we get a notice that we’ll have to evacuate in xxx period of time, we can load up some essentials in our camper before we go.  But maybe not.  We’ve been lucky, but we’ve seen a number of people in our state, over the last few years, standing around shelters with nothing but the PJ’s they are wearing!

So am beginning to establish my middle ground for preparation.  The things I want to get and the order I’d like to get them.  As I said to my husband, at some point, when we’re old,  we may just spend a few years living off our stash!

May it be so!

 

how much

how much prepping is enough?  How far do you go in creating a secure space?  Is it so secure that it takes an hour to get in when you know you’ve got half that to get your essentials out because of a fire?    And what IF?  what if you are out visiting friends and family at a wedding when TSHTF?  you’ll be miles away from your stash, wearing your best clothes, with (hopefully) your weekend bug out bag.  of course, if you flew to your destination and rented a car, with airport security as it is, you might not even have that with you!  At some point you have to draw a line in the sand.  We live in a small city, many miles from a slightly larger city, which is MANY miles from the next size up city.  1/2 an hour by car to the first, 45 -60 minutes to the next, and 90 miles from the nearest major metropolitan area.  Fire is probably our biggest concern.  Fire could take it all away in moments.  No matter how careful we are.  So how far, how much, how secure?

Link

LDSAVOW

for anyone preparing for the EOTWAWKI, the LDS offer a free download of their preparednes manual.  Right now, i’m reading the hardcopy version.  Omit the religious POV’s, but they are big time preparers for the troubles that are to come.  lots of advice, recommendations, suggestions, and ideas.  From food, to medicines, to weaponry.  This is a good place to start making your lists for your bug out bags, short term stores, and long term prepping.  They fully believe that the second coming of Christ will be preceeded by catastrophes.  So they feel that if prepared, there is no fear.  or as they point out, Noah built the ark BEFORE it bgan to rain.

Regardless of what your POV, trouble is coming and there is nothing wrong with being prepared.

the letters stand for Latter day saints another voice of warning.

http://www.ldsavow.com/FreeResources.html