Normalcy bias

This came up in reading my LDS preparedness manual last night.  Have read this before, but the term didn’t register as it has this time.  Guess because we are seeing so much of it going on now.

Basically, its just the psychological behavior of the brain not processing what’s going on; this terrible thing isn’t happening, or, it can’t happen, or, it won’t happen to me, or, that’s too dreadful a scenario for me to conceptualize.  The most common time we all experience it, is the death, or imminent death,  of a loved one.  The denial is the first stage and sometimes its where we get stuck.

Or the destruction of our home in a fire or tornado or hurricane or flood.  I’ll wake up tomorrow and it will all be a bad dream.

At some point, we have to cope and go through the stages of grief and come out the other side – and sometimes, people don’t.

So what has that to do with preparedness?  If you can’t bend your mind around the idea that something terrible could happen and it could happen to you, how can you ‘prepare’ for it?  To begin doing so, even on the smallest scale, is to admit that it could be true!  Keeping a few gallons of water and some canned food if you live in an area prone to power outages is one thing.  You’ve experienced them, you know they are temporary.  But to imagine that it won’t be temporary?  That someone won’t be around to fix it and make it better in a few days?  That’s like being faced with opening the door behind which might be the hungry tiger!

Its true, the likelihood that we will truly be faced with a for-ever situation is slight.  It is far more likely, we will be faced with something temporary. But temporary could be months or even years!  Why do you think the people of the U.S., the least effected country in the world, had to scramble with victory gardens and rationing during WWII?  If there had been stores in the basement to augment the shortages, and a lot of people did have them as it was a more rural society then, it wasn’t much more than an inconvenience.  But for some people, WWII rationing WAS a hardship!

Now, we are hooked on technology. at the same time we have solar and wind power turbines available for the common man.  We have portable battery storage. enough so that some people will notice little difference in terms of having lights on, refrigerators working, maybe even air conditioning.  If they have a well, they will still have running hot and cold water!  They can watch DVD’s, use their DVR’s, read stored books on their electronic devices.

For most of us, cutting the power will be true future shock.  Know my food stores are not up to even months of shortages and my water supplies are probably only good for a week.  Need more water filters so we can make use of creek, ponds, puddles, pools, or standing water from the bathtub.

Yes, I suffer from Normalcy Bias too, augmented by husband’s more severe form.  But current events are changing his way of thinking, and he has more faith in what I’ve been storing than I have – but then, I know the inventory!  And I’ve long known that to give in to REALLY storing up food and water, I’m admitting that the worst can probably happen – and like most people, don’t want to!

 

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