practice practice practice

As expensive as ammunition is, adding a laser pistol to your arsenal will set you back a pretty penny.  But this year, bit the bullet as they say, and added a Laserlyte with a couple of laser reactive targets to my routine.  Haven’t had a chance to get to the range for several months now, but even if I could, it is just static practice.

Santa brought me a couple of gong targets, but even they only do so much.

There was a choice between a Laserlyte and a SIRT laser gun.  both are weighted plastic guns that shoot laser light when the trigger is pulled.  The SIRT has more options, but are all pistol.  The Laserlyte also came as a revolver and since I’m a wheel gun woman, that’s what I wanted to work with.

The nice thing about these training guns is the ability to use them at home.  Practice draw and shoot. practice moving and shooting. practice in low light conditions. practice getting up from bed with your flashlight in the dark. practice from the hip shots, single hand shots, stop and aim shots.

They still lack certain aspects of live ammo – like noise, kick, and even the weight is a little light.  BUT, they are useful to develop muscle memory, stance, and just practice, practice, practice in places where you are most likely to need your self-defense skills.

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2018

Find it hard to believe how fast time seems to pass as we get older.  Find it hard, sometimes, to comprehend how I got to be 68 years old and its already 2018!

Over the years, have seen the world dance close to the ‘edge’, and then dance back.  Right now we seem to be dancing closer than ever and as one problem gets solved, we’re facing so many more.  And so prepping continues as well as concerns for our personal health and well being.  The better we are individually, the better we can cope with what ever gets thrown at us.

Unfortunately, starting in 2016, began having some fairly serious arthritis flairs, and admit let that get to me.  And in doing that, let my exercise and diet guidelines go.  Now I face the future overweight and uncomfortable.  So one of my goals for this coming year is to bring that somewhat under control.  Am not crippled by my arthritis, but if I don’t lose 80 lbs, I might find that to be the case in the very near future!

The arthritis and my weight have also cramped my shooting; from how I can carry to how well I can hold and trigger my guns.  My practice has been using a laserlyte revolver – more on that in another post.

I wish you all an achievement of your goals in the coming year.  Health and happiness be yours.

merry and happy y’all!!

having been caught up in the end of the year push, haven’t been doing much posting at all.  So while I’m wishing you all a joyous holiday season, am using this opportunity to get something off my chest.

Had  joined a Prepping group on FB to try and pick up some ideas and tips on stuff.  After a few weeks, have realized I’m better off sort of talking to myself here.

It was a nice mix of folks, from all over the world, who had in common prepping. They purported to be strictly about SHTF scenerios, not disaster, EOTWAWKI scenerios.   Unfortunately, there was too much about BOBs, Get home bags (yes, important if you have to commute to work) and Inch (I’m never coming home) bags.  Lots of discussion about what makes up a good first aid bag – read full trauma set up.

Now, from my personal POV, a bug out bag is for leaving your house in an emergency, like fire, or to move from place to place.  Most of us do not have a remote, fully set up, bug out location, right?  So unless you are just going for short term or have a place to go, that BOB is setting you up for 3 days until you suffer badly.  Of course, in a SHTF scenario, the worst of the emergency should be over in 3 days and the authorities have either moved in or you are back at home.

Most of the contents of those BOB’s also had nothing to do with things like clothing and toiletries, it was things like fire starters, water purifiers, axes and knives, paracord, tents, etc.

Yes, I have a BOB set up because we live in an area that could see disasterous fire!  So have enough packed up to gives us clothing and such for three days, including some food for the dog.  Yes, there is a small camp stove, propane bottle, water filter and dehydrated food in there in case we have to camp because hotels are full or it will take awhile to get to one.  But its about temporary needs.  If we have to leave our house, we lose our preps, so then what?

When women began talking about stuff like birth control the guys got rude and crude.  In other words, not their problem and they didn’t like the alternatives that the women were coming up with.  Sorry dudes, but do you really think the condom makers will be in business if it gets that bad?

and we weren’t really allowed to talk about self-defense or guns.

and they really put down people who bought things like solar powered battery “generators” rather than build their own.

Now while I get that a lot of people (me included) like their gizmos and gadgets, this is not a case of who has the most toys wins, right?!  Its about making personal decisions and hoping you have all the right preps to support that life style.  If you are preparing for a major EOTWAWKI event, you will be fine through a temporary SHTF scenario.  and if the worst happens, you will hopefully be adequately prepared to make the transition from comfortable lifestyle to self-sufficient living.

But what really pushed me out was when the guy who ran the forum said that there hadn’t been a SHTF situation yet and it was unlikely to happen.  WHAT!!!  I’m sure that for the people who suffered from the record forest fires in the North West and CA this year would disagree with that. As would the hurricane survivors in Texas, LA, FL and Puerto Rico!  If the thinks the only SHTF situation that counts is one that is nation wide, then we quickly move from SHTF to EOTWAWKI.  Just a little breakdown in food delivery to the cities will see those cities burn to the ground!

All in all, it HAS made me aware that as I’ve gotten older, my choices and preps have to change.  We continue, as a race of people, to dance to the edge of the abyss and, fortunately have so far, then danced back.  Sadly, see we are now dancing at the edge with some madmen who really don’t see a danger of falling off that edge.  Or maybe they think that edge is stronger than it looks.   What ever, it makes me hope that we can hold off the events for a few decades longer, cause I’m not looking forward to having to spend my senior years living like a pioneer in the western wilderness!

 

keeping fit

Now I’m down to the one GP100 revolver for my handguns, being accurate with it and learning to reload it quickly are a must.

After a year of neglect, have gotten back to a habit of regular exercise.  Having arthritis makes that imperative, to keep the muscles that support the joints strong.  It also helps keep the pain levels tolerable.

Shooting at the range yesterday, can see that the work on strengthening my hands, wrist and arms has paid off as my groupings were tighter and stayed that way through the entire 1/2 hour session.

attrition

If you’ve ever wondered how gun sales stay so high, where and how do all those guns go, let me explain attrition.

20+ years ago my DH bought me my first .22 pistol to get me started (and what a monster he created!).  A few months later, that was traded in for a used S&W 59 9mm and a new Springfield .45.  the 9mm got old, springs wore, parts got loose and when it came time for getting my CCW, bought a new Ruger P95.  Also picked up a Ruger LCR for concealed carry.  lost the P95 (don’t ask) and replaced it with a Ruger 1911.  Along the way had also fallen in love with an older S&W Model 19 (.357) with 6″ barrel and the Ruger GP100 with 4″ barrel.

So fast forward to today:

the S&W 59 is worn out and not a reliable gun anymore.  Won’t even hold the magazine securely and parts are not available.  Is it worth going to the gunsmith and paying the $$ for custom work? don’t think so

The Springfield .45 was sold a few years ago to a friend, who has since died, and the gun ????

Lost the P95 (still, don’t ask)

sold the 1911 to our nephew

The friend who had bought the Springfield was shooting the model 19 and not paying attention that he had a misfire and a bullet had gotten stuck in the muzzle. He kept shooting until he split the barrel.

and a week ago, this happenedwednesday3

SO, out of 7 gun purchases, I’m down to the Ruger GP100.  Good thing I like that gun!!!

And that’s where and how people keep buying guns.

 

working out at the range

Having recently gotten off my duff and joined (and am using) our local range, am having the opportunity to really shoot my hand guns, as well as my rifles.

And in doing so, am winnowing out some of my earlier choices.

Take for example my beloved side ported, compact 45 Springfield purchased some 20 years ago.  At the time, LOVED that gun.  Its still a great gun, but arthritis has made it not so user friendly anymore, so sold that about 5 years ago.

A couple of years ago had purchased a wonderful Ruger 1911 TALO edition.  LOVED it,  but again, arthritis made racking that slide tough.  The larger size gun and heavier weight made it easier to use than the Springfield because the weight countered the recoil.  But not being able to rack the slide with any consistency, especially when it hung up on the slide lock and I couldn’t reach round with my thumb to release it.  So sold the gun.

Just put new grips on my 40 year old Colt Cobra.  Makes it easier to hold on to, but that recoil on that small gun is tough to overcome, especially when shooting single handed.  The same is true for the original Ruger LCR I bought some 10 years ago.  So one is probably going to go.

And that leads to another thought; shoot the largest gun you can handle.  Some of you have small hands.  Some of you are buying for concealibility.  Well, you can camouflage a pretty big gun if necessary.  BUT the real reason I say this, is the larger and heavier the gun, the easier it will be to control recoil and get back on target.

This is not the old bigger is better argument, I don’t care if you’re shooting a .380!  I’ve seen those and they are barely bigger than my hand.  like the .38’s, they are tough to hold onto and control!  Ruger is making one almost the size of a compact 9mm and was really tempted!  But if I’m going to go that big, will just go for the compact 9mm!

Now THAT is the bigger is better argument!! 😉

But even those with smaller hands can go comfortably into the compact 9mm size without trouble, instead of playing it safe with one of those teeny .38’s that’s hardly bigger than a sneeze.

Because honestly, it will definitely have to be TEOTWAWKI before we will find ourselves in a running gun battle with multiple targets from 100 yards.  Any self defense situation we might encounter will be very up close and personal.  and pretty much anything is effective at close range if you are in a fight for your life.

So get what you will be physically comfortable with and practice, practice, practice.  Join a range where you can rent different guns and let your mental level come to the same level as your physical ability.  Try and then buy.

Wish I’d taken my own advice, I’d have saved thousands.  cause you don’t sell them used for anything near what you paid for them new.